Friday, October 26, 2012

Footprints in the Sand


Footprints as adapted by me for the cover of Wonder Woman #13 (Dec 2012) published by DC Comics, with original art by Cliff Chiang. I really liked how the tweaking of that poem worked out for this. Wonder Woman appeals to one of her patron Gods then is enlightened when she realizes she doesn’t really need them. As a character and symbol Wonder Woman kicks ass.

And for those that don’t get the point and think Hera abandoned her, the lesson is: when Wonder Woman didn’t need any help she left Hera behind. Maybe they missed the ‘stood on your own’ part. There is also a reference to 'panels of her life' and not 'scenes' because comic book character. This isn't a jab at Christianity or religion either. This is, however.

Issue Credits: Story: Brian Azarello, Art: Tony Akins & Dan Green, Colors: Matthew Wilson, Letters: Jared K. Fletcher.

3 comments:

  1. I've always found "Footprints" disturbing because it implies that we aren't supposed to learn or grow from faith, or find strength in it, but only be propped up and remain pathetic and needy. If religion is worth anything, it should be at the very least include what you present here.

    As an atheist I have no particular problem with the concept of faith, as it is said, faith moves mountains, and people can be inspired to do such things by faith. But faith is rarely used constructively for either the individual or the community.

    How far do you think we would get if we started a religion that stressed the constructive use of faith?

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  2. I'd prefer the application of the constructive use of rationality. All religion begins with the false premise that magic is real.

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  3. Yes, but in the real world you just aren't going to get everyone to follow rationality. Most of them are sheep. So why not start a religion based on the worship/application of rationality? They wouldn't have to understand it, just follow it.

    Faith is a tricky thing to define. There's faith in the magic of religion, but also in the faith that it takes to do something that has not been done before, such as go to the moon, where your faith is that the unknown will become known, problems will get solved, etc. Faith is belief in something that does not exist, even if it is something that does not currently exist but you believe COULD exist through the application of principles.

    I think these are similar psychological phenomena, and one could construct a "religion" that takes the psychological power of faith and channels it into the application of rationality.

    Carl Sagan expressed just such a hope: "A religion old or new, that stressed the magnificence of the universe as revealed by modern science, might be able to draw forth reserves of reverence and awe hardly tapped by the conventional faiths. Sooner or later such a religion will emerge."

    Thoughts?

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